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NM EPHT: AirNOW Air Quality Index

AIRNOW U.S. and Southwest Air Quality Index (AQI) Maps

AIRNOW Southwest U.S. AQI (Combined PM2.5 and O3): Current Hour

The Air Quality Index (AQI) Key is presented as a table, to the right of this map. Also, see the AQI Guide.

AIRNow Southwest U.S. Current-Hour Combined PM2.5 and O3 AQI

0 to 50
Good
51 to 100
Moderate
101 to 150
Unhealthy for
Sensitive Groups
151 to 200
Unhealthy
201 to 300
Very Unhealthy
301 to 500
Hazardous

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AIRNOW Southwest U.S. AQI (Combined PM2.5 and O3): Animated Loop

The Air Quality Index (AQI) Key is presented as a table, to the right of this map. Also, see the AQI Guide.

AIRNow Southwest U.S. Hourly Combined PM2.5 and O3 AQI Animation
0 to 50
Good
51 to 100
Moderate
101 to 150
Unhealthy for
Sensitive Groups
151 to 200
Unhealthy
201 to 300
Very Unhealthy
301 to 500
Hazardous

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AIRNOW U.S. AQI (Combined PM2.5 and O3): Current Hour

The Air Quality Index (AQI) Key is presented as a table, to the right of this map. Also, see the AQI Guide.

AIRNow U.S. Current-Hour Combined PM2.5 and O3 AQI
0 to 50
Good
51 to 100
Moderate
101 to 150
Unhealthy for
Sensitive Groups
151 to 200
Unhealthy
201 to 300
Very Unhealthy
301 to 500
Hazardous

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AIRNOW U.S. Animation: 14-Hour AQI (Combined PM2.5 and O3) Loop

The Air Quality Index (AQI) Key is presented as a table, to the right of this map. Also, see the AQI Guide.

Animation for 12:20 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., 20-minute increments. Animation reflects 24-hour average concentration, calculated from observed 1-hour data.

AIRNOW U.S. Combined O3 and PM2.5 14-Hour-Loop AQI Map
0 to 50
Good
51 to 100
Moderate
101 to 150
Unhealthy for
Sensitive Groups
151 to 200
Unhealthy
201 to 300
Very Unhealthy
301 to 500
Hazardous

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AIRNOW U.S. AQI: Hourly PM2.5

The Air Quality Index (AQI) Key is presented as a table, to the right of this map. Also, see the AQI Guide.

AIRNOW U.S. Hourly PM2.5 AQI Map
0 to 50
Good
51 to 100
Moderate
101 to 150
Unhealthy for
Sensitive Groups
151 to 200
Unhealthy
201 to 300
Very Unhealthy
301 to 500
Hazardous

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AIRNOW U.S. AQI: 8-Hour O3

The Air Quality Index (AQI) Key is presented as a table, to the right of this map. Also, see the AQI Guide.

AIRNOW U.S. Ozone (O3) 8-Hour AQI Map
0 to 50
Good
51 to 100
Moderate
101 to 150
Unhealthy for
Sensitive Groups
151 to 200
Unhealthy
201 to 300
Very Unhealthy
301 to 500
Hazardous

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AIRNOW Air Quality Index Data

These Air Quality Index current and animated maps are from AIRNOW, http://airnow.gov (external site).
Current Ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter (PM2.5) data are published as soon as practical after the end of each hour and as such are not fully validated. Maps are also archived in the same way. Therefore, data are only approved for the expressed purpose of reporting and forecasting the Air Quality. Maps are generally available after 9 a.m. EST. The animated Particle map is for a 24-hour loop. Each color-coded circle on the maps above indicates the Air Quality Index (AQI) category for a ground-based air quality monitoring station. See the AIRNow Web site for information on how AQI maps are calculated and about monitoring stations.

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Air Quality Index (AQI) (from AQI – A Guide to Air Quality and Your Health)

The AQI is an index for reporting daily air quality. It tells you how clean or polluted your air is, and what associated health effects might be a concern for you. The AQI focuses on health effects you may experience within a few hours or days after breathing polluted air. EPA calculates the AQI for five major air pollutants regulated by the Clean Air Act: ground-level ozone, particle pollution (also known as particulate matter), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide. For each of these pollutants, EPA has established national air quality standards to protect public health. Ground-level ozone and airborne particles are the two pollutants that pose the greatest threat to human health in this country.

How Does the AQI Work?

Think of the AQI as a yardstick that runs from 0 to 500. The higher the AQI value, the greater the level of air pollution and the greater the health concern. For example, an AQI value of 50 represents good air quality with little potential to affect public health, while an AQI value over 300 represents hazardous air quality.

An AQI value of 100 generally corresponds to the national air quality standard for the pollutant, which is the level EPA has set to protect public health. AQI values below 100 are generally thought of as satisfactory. When AQI values are above 100, air quality is considered to be unhealthy – at first for certain sensitive groups of people, then for everyone as AQI values get higher.

Understanding the AQI

The purpose of the AQI is to help you understand what local air quality means to your health. To make it easier to understand, the AQI is divided into six categories:

Air Quality Index
(AQI) Values
Levels of Health
Concern
Colors Meanings
When the AQI
is in this range:
...air quality
conditions are:
...as symbolized
by this color:
...with this
health concern:

See AIRNOW Air Quality Index (AQI) site: A Guide to Air Quality and Your Health (external site).
The AIRNOW AQI Guide was last updated September 3, 2010.

0 to 50 Good Green Air quality is considered satisfactory, and air pollution poses little or no risk.
51 to 100 Moderate Yellow Air quality is acceptable; however, for some pollutants there may be a moderate health concern for a very small number of people who are unusually sensitive to air pollution.
101 to 150 Unhealthy for
Sensitive Groups
Orange Members of sensitive groups may experience health effects. The general public is not likely to be affected.
151 to 200 Unhealthy Red Everyone may begin to experience health effects; members of sensitive groups may experience more serious health effects.
201 to 300 Very Unhealthy Purple Health alert: everyone may experience more serious health effects.
301 to 500 Hazardous Maroon Health warnings of emergency conditions. The entire population is more likely to be affected.

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